Monthly Archives: July 2012

Attitudes to tax-dodging in Britain

At the recent launch of Kate Bell & Declan Gaffney’s report on the ‘nothing for something’ benefits system, Richard Exell of the TUC asked if people had become more sympathetic to tax-dodging at the same time as they’ve become more hostile to … Continue reading

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Inequality Roundup, Stories in the News

Today I want to post a roundup of some items in the news that piqued my interest, we have poverty measurement, disabilities, spending on children in the US, Medicaid and mortality, getting high schoolers to go to college, and health/income … Continue reading

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Why more equal societies have more stable economies

In this guest post, the writer/researcher and author of ‘The Cost of Inequality’ Stewart Lansley looks at the link between equality and economic stability – building on Rob de Vries’ earlier two posts on the blog. According to current economic orthodoxy, … Continue reading

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When social policy goes wrong

When social policy experts create a new intervention to solve some social problem or make people’s lives better, there’s two possible outcomes they’re expecting: either the intervention works, or it doesn’t. But what we forget is that there’s a third … Continue reading

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The Earned Income Tax Credit is a Very Good Investment in Infant Health

Welfare reform was a battle fought over the wisdom of using federal dollars to supplement the incomes of low-income mothers and their children. Yet, even as Congress in the 1990s worked to cut cash assistance in the Aid to Dependent … Continue reading

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Could inequality have caused the financial crisis?

In the last of his three posts on ‘Increasing inequality: Causes, Consequences and the Great Recession’, Robert de Vries looks at whether high levels of inequality could have actually been one of the causes of the economic crisis we now … Continue reading

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A More Perfect Union: What do New Yorkers owe Texans?

In the United States, the federal government and the fifty states split the check for many social assistance programs. Within this partnership, considerable discretion is given to each state in defining eligibility for cash welfare, public health insurance, workforce development, … Continue reading

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Where do we go from here?

In this final report on the Attitudes to Wealth and Economic Inequality in the UK event run by Cumberland Lodge, Charlotte Cavaille asks ‘where do we go from here on attitudes to redistribution?’  From the two previous posts, the following picture emerges: the UK has become … Continue reading

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Healing the economy by making it more equal

In the second of three posts on ‘Increasing Inequality: Causes, Consequences and the Great Recession’, Robert de Vries discusses whether we can work our way out of economic crisis while still reducing inequality. As I said last week, plenty of … Continue reading

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Harshness or stability in attitudes to redistribution?

In the previous post from Charlotte Cavaille based on the Attitudes to Wealth and Economic Inequality in the UK event run by Cumberland Lodge, she examined how the “middle” had faired during a time of continuous increase in the income gap between the bottom and … Continue reading

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