Tag Archives: cross-national research

U.S. Health Disadvantage is Not Inevitable

Two major research studies in the last year compare health indicators in the United States with other major upper-income countries. Both exhaustively review government statistics and published articles. The first study, from the Institute of Medicine, draws on a panel … Continue reading

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Educational Inequalities in Parents’ Time with Children

In a guest post, Pablo Gracia looks at inequalities in how parents spend time with their children, using his own research on the UK and Spain – and then considers the likely causes, consequences, and what this might all mean for … Continue reading

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Is ‘the paradox of redistribution’ dead?

It has all the makings of a great academic fist-fight.* In a classic 1998 article, Walter Korpi and Joakim Palme wrote a hugely influential article called ‘the paradox of redistribution,’ which argued that a targeted benefit system ended up achieving … Continue reading

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Social Progress – A League Table

Strange though it is to say, but alternatives to GDP are becoming fashionable. This week saw the launch of a new measure of ‘social progress’ on which to rank countries – and perhaps surprisingly, Britain did really rather well, not … Continue reading

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British and U.S. Inequality Over the Lifecourse: An Important New Report

Ben and I both attended the Social Change Harvard-Manchester Initiative (SCHMi) summer institute in 2010, a joint program between the University of Manchester and Harvard. A core group of SCHMi researchers just released a report, authored by Rourke O’Brien (also … Continue reading

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Converging Income Inequality in Brazil and the United States: Some Uncomfortable Realities

Professor Fernando Luiz Lara from the University of Texas at Austin discusses the political and social dimensions of changing income inequality in Brazil and the United States. The US will become as unequal as Brazil.  And that bothers both societies. As we … Continue reading

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Microclass mobility (and its critics)

A few weeks ago I blogged about the idea of looking at class inequality in terms of ‘microclasses’ – that is, instead of looking at ‘big class’ inequality (e.g.  professionals vs. manual workers), we look at ‘microclass’ inequality (e.g. welders … Continue reading

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The positive and negative consequences of the welfare state

In a previous post, I argued that people had exaggerated the extent to which public support for the benefits system had fallen in Britain. Here, I want to look at another aspect of this that also came out recently – … Continue reading

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When the insecure are not the disadvantaged

Amidst all the other excitements of the summertime, you might have missed a couple of significant papers by top scholars in top American journals. So just to mentally prepare you for the autumn – don’t worry, it’s not here yet! … Continue reading

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Healing the economy by making it more equal

In the second of three posts on ‘Increasing Inequality: Causes, Consequences and the Great Recession’, Robert de Vries discusses whether we can work our way out of economic crisis while still reducing inequality. As I said last week, plenty of … Continue reading

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