Author Archives: Ben Baumberg Geiger

About Ben Baumberg Geiger

I am a Senior Lecturer in Sociology and Social Policy at the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR) at the University of Kent. I also helped set up the collaborative research blog Inequalities, where I write articles and short blog posts. I have a wide range of research interests, at the moment focusing on disability, the workplace, inequality, deservingness and the future of the benefits system, and the relationship between evidence and policy. You can find out more about me at http://www.benbgeiger.co.uk

What effect do sanctions & conditionality have on disabled people?

I have just blogged about this over at my other blog, Rethinking Incapacity – you can read the full blog post (with the link to the research articles) here.

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Sharp softening of attitudes to benefit claimants, reveals new data

Over the past twenty-five years, there has been a major and widely-reported change in British attitudes towards benefit claimants: simply put, we are less positive about benefit claimants than we used to be. More of us think that ‘large numbers … Continue reading

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The return of the Inequalities blog

After being dormant for most of the last two years, the Inequalities blog is starting up again! It won’t return to its heyday of weekly posts from the US and UK (at least, not yet), but I will be starting to … Continue reading

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Are there neighbourhoods where benefit claims aren’t stigmatised?

According to one commentator in The Times, an underclass of benefit claimants is “now contaminating the life of entire neighbourhoods—which is one of the most insidious aspects of the phenomenon, for neighbours who don’t share those values cannot isolate themselves”. … Continue reading

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Just how common is benefits stigma in Britain?

To (loosely) coincide with my paper on benefits stigma coming out in the Journal of Social Policy, I’ve written a short summary on the LSE Politics and Policy blog. (Long-running readers of the blog will see that this is a developed version of … Continue reading

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Myths about out-of-work benefit claims?

There’s been a lot of talk about ‘benefit myths’ over the last few years – the things that people believe about the benefits system that aren’t actually true. I’ve almost finished a paper on this – watch this space! – but … Continue reading

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Trends in out-of-work benefit claimants in Britain

As long-term readers will know, I’m intrigued by people’s beliefs about the benefit system, and their truthfulness or falsity of these beliefs. Later in the summer, I’ll talk about a new aspect of this: people’s perceptions of how many out-of-work benefit claimants exist, … Continue reading

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The strong but declining support for pensioner benefits

I’ve just written a piece on the LSE British Politics & Policy blog with Peter Taylor-Gooby for the launch of the latest, ever-interesting British Social Attitudes report. Comment at LSE BPP if you want to discuss it!

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Global inequality is declining – maybe

I don’t have enough time to write a full post on this, but anyone who’s interested in this blog (and my previous post on this) will surely be interested in Branko Milanovic’s new estimates of global inequality, which suggest a decline … Continue reading

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Benefits, food banks, and denial

A blazing row erupted earlier this week with the publication of a charity research report on food banks – the latest in a series of blazing rows on food bank use in the UK.  At stake was the claim that … Continue reading

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