Author Archives: Ben Baumberg Geiger

About Ben Baumberg Geiger

I am a Senior Lecturer in Sociology and Social Policy at the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR) at the University of Kent. I also helped set up the collaborative research blog Inequalities, where I write articles and short blog posts. I have a wide range of research interests, at the moment focusing on disability, the workplace, inequality, deservingness and the future of the benefits system, and the relationship between evidence and policy. You can find out more about me at http://www.benbgeiger.co.uk

Can poverty rise while inequality is flat?

I recently saw a great post about how there’s been a big increase in inequality within the bottom half of the income distribution (between the 3rd and 1st (bottom) deciles) from 1996-2008, which then fell but rose again 2011-2016. The … Continue reading

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Most people are ‘benefit claimants’ sometimes…

One of the biggest misconceptions about the benefits system is that we split neatly and permanently into two groups: ‘benefit claimants’ and ‘everyone else’. As soon as you take a long view, though, you realise how wrong this is: many … Continue reading

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Sanctioning disabled benefit claimants: is it fair and is it effective?

This piece was cross-posted in the Demos Quarterly, issue 13. The sanctioning of disabled benefit claimants is a reality in Britain: over a million benefit sanctions have been applied to disabled people since 2010. We therefore cannot avoid asking: can … Continue reading

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(No posts during the UCU strike)

To avoid a long silence, I just wanted to flag that I won’t be writing any proper posts during the UCU strike action which I’m part of, but I’ll return to regular posts next week from the w/c 19th March … Continue reading

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How a better WCA is possible

Ironically, sometimes it is a policy’s failures rather than successes that make it difficult to reform. The Work Capability Assessment (WCA) for out-of-work disability benefits has been a failure by almost any criteria – yet it is still with us, … Continue reading

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Highlights from the ‘Rethinking Incapacity’ blog

One of the reasons that the Inequalities blog has been quiet for a little while is that I set up a separate blog to focus on my 2014-17 project on disability, work and the benefits system, called Rethinking Incapacity. That blog … Continue reading

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The full return of the Inequalities blog

After a long gap and an intermittent return last year (including a great post by Paolo Brunori), the Inequalities blog is back! We have a series of posts lined up, including on disability & the benefits system, whether the public believe … Continue reading

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What effect do sanctions & conditionality have on disabled people?

I have just blogged about this over at my other blog, Rethinking Incapacity – you can read the full blog post (with the link to the research articles) here.

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Sharp softening of attitudes to benefit claimants, reveals new data

Over the past twenty-five years, there has been a major and widely-reported change in British attitudes towards benefit claimants: simply put, we are less positive about benefit claimants than we used to be. More of us think that ‘large numbers … Continue reading

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The return of the Inequalities blog

After being dormant for most of the last two years, the Inequalities blog is starting up again! It won’t return to its heyday of weekly posts from the US and UK (at least, not yet), but I will be starting to … Continue reading

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